Tag Archives: prevention plus

6 Dangerous Sunscreen Mistakes

@daniellebaum

With skin cancer on the rise here in Australia, it’s more important than ever to get smart when it comes to sunscreen. Protect yourself by checking out these common mistakes that you may be making with your sunscreen.

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  1. I don’t need to sunscreen because I need the Vitamin D. It’s true. Vitamin D is essential as it absorbs calcium and promotes bone growth. But you can get a sufficient amount of Vitamin D by spending only 10-15 minutes in the sun. It’s not worth foregoing sunscreen, as most people don’t apply enough to prevent the production of Vitamin D anyway.
  2. One application lasts an entire day. One application in the morning isn’t going to last you throughout the entire day. If you are swimming, playing sports, or spending the day out in the sun, then your sunscreen should be reapplied approximately every two hours.
  3. I don’t need the sunscreen because I have dark skin. While people with more pigment in their skin do have a lower risk of getting cancer, they are not completely immune. As a matter of fact, skin cancer can be even more dangerous for those with darker skin as it’s often diagnosed in the later stages.
  4. A base tan protects me. A tan is your body’s reaction to UV exposure. It’s a sign that damage has already been done, and this does not protect your skin from further damage.
  5. I only need to protect my face. Many people only apply sunscreen to their face in order to protect it from premature aging. While this is a good habit, the truth is that you can develop skin cancer anywhere the sun touches. Don’t forget your neck, hands, legs and feet not only for the sake of protecting your skin from cancer, but protecting those areas from premature aging as well.
  6. I’ll be inside all day. While windows do block more intense UV rays, it still allows enough rays to pass through to cause damage. You can easily swap your everyday moisturizer with the PREVENTION+ Daily Hydrating Moisturizer that has an SPF of 30.

@daniellebaum

Fun in the sun beach bag essentials:

  1. Keeping your hat in your bag is a cardinal rule when it comes to the subject of sun protection. It can protect your scalp ad cut down on the rays that are hitting on your face and neck.
  2. When it comes to any outdoor trip, sunglasses are an obvious requirement. While protecting your eyes from the sun so you can safely explore those summer horizons. They also provide sun protection for delicate eye area and prevents squinting… which can lead to wrinkles.14723556_351649061843501_2953693591219732480_n
  3. Lip balm. Keep your pout hydrated and beach-ready with IMAGE Skincare’s ORMEDIC Balancing Lip Enhancement Complex.
  4. Beach towel. This handy item provides a safe haven to rest your rump and it doubles as a cover-up if you feel like you having too much sin with your fun.
  5. Grapes, strawberries and watermelon make perfect snacks for the beach. They are refreshing, sweet and won’t make you feel too full or lethargic.
  6. Plenty of water. Don’t forget to pack the biggest bottle of water you can find. Staying hydrated on a hot day is important not only for your skin but also prevents dehydration.
  7. Sun-protection. Tanned skin looks beautiful but how long does it last? Wrinkles, pigmentation and skin cancer are long term. Make sure you use a sunscreen with a minimum of SPF 30 and if you’d like to be a bit tanner before entering the beach; use Sunescape Tanning Mousse the day before and continue applying the Sunescape Extender to keep that bronzed glow glowing.
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Do you still need to use sunscreen in winter?

sol y nubes

The sun feels weaker, you’re spending less time outside and you think it’s ok to slack off on your usual SPF protection. You’re not getting burnt so you think you’re safe. Right? Wrong.

sol y nubes

The sun’s harmful rays can be almost just as powerful and damaging despite what the thermometer says – especially UVA rays which are responsible for ageing. 90 per cent of visible ageing is due to sun damage – and it doesn’t all happen in summer.

UVB rays (which cause that tell-tale sunburn) are indeed less intense in the winter months, however UVA rays are still out in full intensity – all day and all year-long they hit with the same ferocity as in the very peak of summer.

“There is hardly a day that goes by when UV radiation does not threaten some acceleration in skin ageing or bring forward the time when skin cancer appears.”

— The Skin & Cancer Foundation’s Dr Rod Hannaford

 

UVA rays, which account for up to 95 percent of UV rays that reach the Earth’s surface, penetrate deeper into skin, cause wrinkles and have been associated with melanoma, the most deadly type of skin cancer. According to a 2014 report by The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Australia and New Zealand have the highest rates of melanoma in the world. In fact, one person will die every six hours from melanoma in Australia. While 90% of cases are treatable, prevention is the best cure.

Not only does year-round sunscreen application significantly reduce the risk of developing melanoma it also delays the signs of ageing. A 2013 study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine found that test subjects who used sunscreen daily decreased the speed of the skin’s ageing process by 24% compared to the group that did not.

It’s important to remember that UVA rays can even penetrate clouds and glass, so you’re still in harm’s reach when the sun isn’t shining, while driving to and from work, while sitting by the window in your office, or when going for a walk on a cloudy winter’s day. It may not feel particularly warm but the UV index is still high and can still lead to skin damage.

Prevention+ daily ultimate protection moisturizer

Winter skin is also more sensitive to sun than tanned summer skin. During winter the skin is no longer accustomed to UV radiation and melanin concentration is reduced, making it more susceptible to the sun’s effects . Melanin is the skin´s own pigment (responsible for the pigmentation or tanning of skin) and is built in response to UV light to protect the skin’s cells against damaging UV radiation. With less UV exposure in winter time, skin produces less melanin and as a result becomes more sensitive to UV radiation when the sunshine finally hits.

Hitting the slopes? UV protection is a must. Reflection of radiation from snow calls for aggressive sunscreen protection show can reflect some 80-90% of the sun’s UV rays. You may be actually safer on the beach mid-summer, with sand reflecting only 25% of UV radiation.

And if you think the added sunscreen in your moisturiser or makeup will suffice for the winter time, think again. While it’s definitely a great start for the time poor, unfortunately it doesn’t leave you fully protected from the effects of UV exposure. The SPF of sunscreens is measured using 2mg/cm-squared but studies have shown that most of us use less than half the amount necessary, which means we only end up getting a square root of what is written on the bottle (ie SPF 5 instead of 25).

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Sun protection should be a habitual part of the daily routine and ideally it should be practised all year round. The harmful effects of UV rays are cumulative, and their long-term and irreversible effects – think increased skin ageing, reduced elasticity, wrinkle formation, uneven pigmentation and sunspots –  might not be seen until many years later.  Why risk it?

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